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Technology could make the roads safer for older drivers

The first members of the baby boom generation began turning 70 in 2016, and the number of senior citizens living in Oklahoma is expected to increase sharply during the next two decades. The U.S. Census Bureau expects the number of Americans aged 70 or older to grow to 54 million by 2030, and road safety advocates are hoping that emerging automotive technology will be able to prevent a surge in the number of elderly traffic accident victims.

Whileolder drivers often have years of experience to draw upon, their bodies are also frailer than they once were. Injuries that a younger driver may be able to shrug off could be catastrophic to an octogenarian, and complex intersections and confusing traffic patterns can be bewildering to senior citizens. However, advances in automobile technology could greatly reduce the number of accidents involving older drivers.

Autonomous vehicles will have no difficulty following even the most circuitous of routes, and accident avoidance systems already on the market are able to steer or brake in emergency situations to avoid a crash. The innovations are arriving quickly, and rear cameras will be installed in all new cars in 2018. Auto makers have pledged to fit automatic braking systems to almost all passenger vehicles by 2022, and Google has announced that it intends to introduce a car with no steering wheel or pedals by 2020.

The injuries suffered by elderly car accident victims can be catastrophic, and personal injury attorneys pursuing civil remedies on their behalf may take proactive steps to ensure that they are compensated fairly when negligent behavior of other motorists was to blame. Attorneys may call upon medical experts to establish that the plaintiff was in good health prior to the accident in question and none of the injuries suffered were the result of a pre-existing condition.

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