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Posts tagged "Car Accidents"

Proper medication lowers crash risk for drivers with ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a condition characterized by the inability to pay attention, poor impulse control and hyperactivity. A study published by "JAMA Psychiatry" has reviewed the records of over 2.3 million drivers diagnosed with ADHD. As Oklahoma motorists might expect, the research shows that accidents are less frequent among ADHD drivers who take medication than those who do not.

NHTSA seeks to reduce autonomous vehicle regulations

Oklahoma residents may be aware that the U.S. Department of Transportation launched an initiative in October 2016 with the goal of eliminating traffic accident deaths around the country within 30 years. The Road to Zero Coalition is made up of the Federal Highway Administration, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the nonprofit National Safety Council, and much of its efforts will be focused on facilitating the development of autonomous vehicle technology.

Nine-year high in car crash deaths, says NHTSA

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has reported that 37,461 people died in car crashes across the U.S. in 2016, creating a nine-year high. Residents of Oklahoma and elsewhere are concerned that new safety technology, such as automatic emergency braking, rearview cameras and lane departure warning systems, are doing little to stem the increase of deaths.

The dangers of trucks with spiked wheel ornaments

Some trucks in Oklahoma might be more dangerous if they have spiked wheel ornaments. These are decorative fittings attached to the lug nuts of tractor-trailer wheels. Made of plastic, metal or aluminum, they could extend far enough to injure a pedestrian, motorcyclist or bicyclist in an accident.

Collision avoidance systems reduce the number of crashes

Oklahoma drivers may not realize that some car manufacturers have been designing collision warning systems for quite some time. Since then, research has shown that certain technology, like lane departure warning systems and blind spot alerts, can prevent car accidents that result in serious injuries.

Why driverless cars might not be available very soon

While many Oklahoma motorists might be looking forward to the day when all of the vehicles on the roads are driverless, that time may not come as quickly as some experts predict. Multiple factors may interplay to prolong the widespread availability of self-driving cars, and the personal preferences of consumers may also make their adoption of these vehicles slower than anticipated.

Device delivers electric shock to keep drivers alert

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowsy driving may be the cause behind up to 6,000 fatal traffic accidents annually. Oklahoma motorists might therefore be interested in a new device designed to keep drivers alert and awake, thanks to its use of electric shocks.

Study claims that higher speed limits have made roads deadlier

Although Oklahoma residents may enjoy driving down roads with higher speed limits, these roadways could be prone to fatal accidents. According to an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study, increasing maximum speed limits have led to at least an additional 33,000 deaths.

Crash tests lead to safety awards for large cars

Three full-sized vehicles popular among Oklahoma drivers have been awarded the highest rating for crashworthiness by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the auto safety organization financed by the car insurance industry. Receiving the Top Safety Pick Plus designation were the Lincoln Continental, Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan and the Toyota Avalon.

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